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What Is a Credit Bureau & What Data Is Included in Your Credit Report?

A credit bureau, also called a credit reporting agency, is a company that collects and stores information about how you manage your credit and finances.1 This data is then used to create your credit reports, which form the foundation of your credit score. Experian, Equifax and TransUnion are the three major credit bureaus and are often grouped together.2 While they’re not the only bureaus in existence, they are some of the most well-known companies that compete for the business of creditors. Let’s address the data collected by credit bureaus, how they obtain that information to create your scores and reports and how to get in touch with them if something isn’t right.

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Thinking About Re-locating? 4 Financial Implications to Consider

Many people are re-evaluating their life plan. I think a few months of lock down will do that to a person. People are getting out of cities and heading for wide open spaces and a quieter pace of life. Others have realized the desire to get closer to family. Maybe you have a good base of friends where you live now, but your children have moved away? As they continue to grow families of their own, a thought may cross your mind-- should we move closer to our children (and grandchildren)? If so, what are some financial considerations to keep in mind?

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Implementing a Financial Wellness Program at Your Company: A Guide

Over half of employees are stressed about their finances.1 As an employee, your career should be a source of financial relief and security—not worry. Ensuring that this rings true for your colleagues is important to both their satisfaction and performance. There’s a reason why 53 percent of companies have started to offer financial wellness programs.2 Keep reading for a full breakdown of financial wellness programs, as well as how to implement one at your own workplace.

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Working From Home: Understanding Home Office Deductions

If the pandemic completely changed what a day at work looks like for you, you’re not alone. 20 percent of working adults have transitioned to remote work due to COVID-19.1 Adapting to this new workspace isn’t easy, particularly with many companies forced to cut pay in order to preserve non-essential employees. And this may not be temporary. There is much discourse around the fact that the shift to work-from-home (WFH) may be permanent for some. If you are one of the many newly working from home, it might make sense to assume that you’d qualify for a home office tax deduction. But in reality, this tax deduction can prove to be a bit tricky.

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Coronavirus and Student Loan Debt: What You Need to Know

Student loan reached $1.48 trillion in America by the end of 2019, with approximately 45 million borrowers across the United States.1 Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, many Americans have experienced financial instability. This means that for 45 million Americans, paying down student loan debt may be harder than ever before. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act, was signed into law on March 27, 2020. While this stimulus package provides a wide array of assistance for families and businesses, it also made some important changes to assist federal student loan borrowers.

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Bear Markets and the Threat of Recession: What You Need to Know

On March 11, 2020 we officially entered a bear market. It was the fastest plunge into a bear market in history. Like many Americans, you’ve likely heard the terms “bull” and “bear” in regards to the market, but what do they mean exactly, and how does a bear market relate to a recession? We’ll discuss below. What Is a Bear Market? A bear market refers to a period of time in which stock prices decline and the overall market outlook is pessimistic. Beyond the daily fluctuations of the market, a bear market is typically marked by a 20 percent or more fall in the market index over at least a two-month period. Bear markets throughout history have varied greatly in severity and length of time. For example, two of the longest bear markets experienced in America include the Stock Market Crash of 1929, which lasted 34 months and the more recent 2007 financial crisis, in which the bear market lasted over 27 months.

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